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Beginnings Guides Blog

Beginnings Pregnancy Guide Update

The 2014 9th! edition of Beginnings Pregnancy Guide, in English and the 4th
Spanish edition are in production. Here are some of the changes to look for.
 
Who to call
A subtle but important revision is in who to call for information or assistance.
Previous editions have said, “... call your doctor.” Since physicians are not
always prepared or inclined to lead discussion of topics that are sensitive or
not strictly medical,  I added home visitors and sometimes doulas on topics
including breast feeding, smoking, abuse, weight gain, depressive symptoms,
conflicting advice, relationship issues, car seats, and labor pain management.
On these and similar subjects the new Beginnings says, “Talk with your doctor,
home visitor or doula.”   This supports a shift in parents’ thinking from “the
doctor takes care of my health” to ‘the doctor helps me take care of my health”.
 
Keys to a Healthy Baby, the health behavior messages that research links directly
to birth outcomes are modified slightly.“Do eat well” is expanded to “Do it well and
often”  since a pregnant body easily and quickly slips into starvation mode. Frequent
small meals best support fetal development.
 
“Do gain weight” is expanded to “Do gain weight slowly” In response to concerns
over obesity and the trend to gaining in excess of guidelines. The latest guidelines
recommend an 11 pound gain for a woman who starts pregnancy overweight.
 
“Do take vitamins” is expanded to “Do take vitamins everyday” to emphasize
the need for consistency to maintain a healthful level of nutrients in the body.
 
Early Inductions
Early term inductions of labor for vaginal birth more than doubled between
1990 and 2006 from 7.5 to 17.3%. And the percentage of later preterm C-section
deliveries increased by 46% from 23.5 to 34.3%.  A 2010 study found 44% of women
had their labor induced, often for convenience of the parent or the physician.
Those women were twice as likely to have a C-section as women who waited for
natural labor.( Ehrnethal  et al. July 2010 Ob&Gyn). In light of that trend, the
updated Pregnancy Guide’s discussion of the course of pregnancy (p46) includes a
statement that “Labor should not be induced before week 40, except for medical
reasons. The section titled  Baby’s Growth and Development, 9th month (p61)
encourages readers to exercise their health literacy skills and speak up about this
concern. “If your doctor talks to you about inducing labor, ask if you wait until
week 40.”
 
Other revisions
Nuchal lucency test is added to the discussion of prenatal testing.
 
Juice is de-emphasized in favor of water.  Juice was considered a healthful
alternative. However, with the increase in obesity, extra calories  and sugars
in juice are of concern.
 
Next: My favorite change. 
 
Reference: National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief 24, Nov 2009.
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db24.pdf
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